Spiritual thirst

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In a few short weeks we will be celebrating and remembering the most important thing to happen to human kind.

We will be celebrating and remembering That Jesus Christ our LORD came to Earth, ministered to us, taught us, healed us, died for us and three days later rose from the dead.

We will be celebrating Easter.

As we draw closer to Easter I have been mindful of the times in my life where I have been spiritually running on Empty and how this is a reality in the lives of many Christians.

We get caught up in family matters, health issues, money worries and so many other things that be become spiritually, emotionally and physically drained.

There are so many things in life that just drain our tanks and keep us on empty. BUT is this the way God created us to be?

As we approach this Easter I felt the Spirit of God prompting us to remember that in all things we are not alone, we are not far from being refilled and refuelled. It is not God’s will or desire for us to be run down, pushed around or fall along the way side.

Though we thirst, God promises that we will be filled.
Though we thirst, God promises that we will be refreshed.
Though we thirst, God promises that we all will be replenished and restored.

Maybe what you need is a fresh encounter with the Grace of God: His grace which is sufficient, His grace which is never ending, His grace that can fill us and make us overflow.

There’s a woman in the bible who felt like you do now. Unloved, on the edge, empty, talked about, needing some encouragement and hope in life. She was an outcast and had a ‘chance’ encounter with Jesus which changed her perspective on life.

In John chapter 4 we read about the Samaritan woman at the well, she was at the well at the hottest part of the day, she was there trying to avoid the people who looked down on her. She was surprised to see anyone there, let along a Jewish man because Jews and Samaritans didn’t get along.

After conversation and Jesus asking for a drink he offers her something precious:

10 Jesus replied, “If you only knew the gift God has for you and who you are speaking to, you would ask me, and I would give you living water.”
11 “But sir, you don’t have a rope or a bucket,” she said, “and this well is very deep. Where would you get this living water? 12 And besides, do you think you’re greater than our ancestor Jacob, who gave us this well? How can you offer better water than he and his sons and his animals enjoyed?”

Her answer is wonderful, do you think your better than me? Than my people? My culture? But there is also something much deeper going on. I think her answer is a deep reference to the law and the Old Testament. The well represents the old way of dealing with God, it was continual, a daily pilgrimage, sacrifice. “How can you offer better water?”

In this old system of yearly sacrifices and pilgrimages to the temple you received enough to get by but not to sustain. Jesus offers the woman and all of us something more.

13 Jesus replied, “Anyone who drinks this water will soon become thirsty again. 14 But those who drink the water I give will never be thirsty again. It becomes a fresh, bubbling spring within them, giving them eternal life.”

Jesus gives us a new way to approach God. Through his life, death and resurrection we have access not just to ‘spiritual water’ that sustains for a little while but to eternal waters that well up inside us and overflow out of our lives.

When we are feeling thirsty let us return our minds and our hearts back to our saviour who has given everything for us and who satisfies every thirst and desire in our lives.

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